Indonesia Forum Public Lecture. “The State of Politics in Indonesia and the Prospects for 2019: A Comparative View”

Emeritus Professor Richard Robison

Discussant: Professor Andrew Rosser

Monday, 5 November 2018

5.15-7.30 pm

Arts West Building

Room 553 (Discursive Space)

The University of Melbourne, Parkville

RSVP: https://bit.ly/2qfD3fL

 

The public lecture tries to look at the underlying structures of politics in Indonesia and the prospects for 2019 and beyond by comparing it with other countries not only in Southeast Asia but also in the Middle East. This can be a useful way to draw out the specific dynamics of politics in Indonesia and its political economy. The questions put forward in the discussion would be: does Joko Widodo’s populist politics which has now turned into authoritarian tendency represent a political phenomenon that is unique and if so, why this is the case? Will someone like Rodrigo Duterte ever emerge in Indonesia? What is the possibility that Indonesia might follow the Thai example of return to military rule? Or, could the Recep Tayyip Erdoğan political model ever take root in Indonesia?

 

Contact: luqmanh@student.unimelb.edu.au

Short Bio: 

Professor Richard Robison is Emeritus Professor in the Asia Research Centre at Murdoch University. He was Professor of Political Economy at the Institute for Social Studies in the Hague, Netherlands (2003-2006). He extensively published books on Indonesian politics and Asia, including Indonesia: The Rise of Capital(1986), The Political Economy of South-East Asia: Conflict, Crisis and Change(2001), Political Economy of Aid Industry in Asia(2014, with J. Hutchison, W. Hout, and C. Hughes).   

Professor Andrew Rosser is Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at the Asia Institute, the University of Melbourne.

 

Richard Robison Public Lecture-tax15q


#Palu Pulih: Fundraising BBQ

Melbournians, come along to our Central Sulawesi Earthquake and Tsunami Fundraiser BBQ! Sat 27 October, 11am-2pm, South Lawn. Entry by donation: $30 adults, $5 children (use Trybooking link below). All donations go to local orgs engaged in recovery efforts.

Booking: https://bit.ly/2O1cwMK


Invitation and Call for Presenters. 37th IF Postgraduate Roundtable

Saturday, 3 November 2018

9.30am-3.00pm

Yasuko Hiraoka Room

Sidney Myer Asia Centre

The University of Melbourne, Parkville

 

Registration:

https://goo.gl/forms/9pY9D3QHHZ226nFj1

 

The Indonesia Forum of the University of Melbourne is hosting a roundtable discussion in 2018 for postgraduates who are engaged in research related to Indonesia. This year the Forum celebrates its 27th year of running as a cross-disciplinary informal and open network of academics and broader communities who share a common interest and professional involvement in Indonesia. The event brings postgraduate (both master & PhD) students together in a multi-disciplinary exchange of scholarly interests and information and provides an opportunity for networking. The aim is to introduce your work to a wider audience, receive inputs from senior academics and make connections with other students and academics whose research may overlap with yours. Certificates will be awarded to presenters. Students are asked to make a 10-minute presentation, in a panel assigned based on their research areas, describing their research in English. Certificates will be awarded to presenters. Refreshments and lunch will be provided.

 

 

 


Indonesia’s Inequality Conference, 1-2 November 2018

 

Conference Website:

https://arts.unimelb.edu.au/e/indonesias-inequalities

 

Overview

This conference examines the nature, causes, and consequences of Indonesia’s inequalities; the ways they are being contested; and options for addressing them to promote greater prosperity, inclusion and welfare.Income and wealth inequality in Indonesia have worsened in recent years. The country is also characterised by marked inequalities in access to health services, education, social security, and political representation, among other things. These inequalities in turn reflect inequalities of power that have class, gender, ethnic and regional dimensions.

Conference Convenors

PROFESSOR ANDREW ROSSER

Professor Andrew Rosser
Professor Andrew Rosser

Andrew Rosser is Professor of Southeast Asian Studies at The University of Melbourne. After completing undergraduate degrees in Commerce and Asian Studies at the University of Adelaide and Flinders University respectively, he enrolled in a PhD in Asian Studies/Politics and International Studies at Murdoch University. Based in the Asia Research Centre, his research there focused on analysing the politics of economic liberalisation in Indonesia during the New Order and early post-New Order periods and the causes and consequences of the 1997-1998 Asian economic crisis. He subsequently worked at the University of Sydney, AusAID, the Institute of Development Studies (Sussex), and the University of Adelaide, building along the way an interest in the political economy of development, policy-oriented research, and social policy.

Between 2012 and 2015, Andrew was an Australian Research Council Future Fellow, carrying out research on the relationship between law, politics and social rights in Indonesia. In addition to conventional academic work, he has also carried out pieces of commissioned research for and/or acted as a consultant to numerous international development organisations including the World Bank, the UK’s Department for International Development, AusAID/DFAT, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Oxfam, UNRISD, and UNDP.

PROFESSOR JOHN MURPHY

Professor John Murphy
Professor John Murphy

Professor John Murphy teaches and researches Australian politics and history, and comparative social policy history, with a developing focus on Indonesian social protection. He has expertise in social policy, examined historically and comparatively. He has published research on Australian social, political and policy history, public narratives about welfare, masculinity and nation, and memory, historiography and biography.

John previously taught at RMIT University where he was Director of the Centre for Applied Social Research. In the Faculty of Arts at The University of Melbourne, he was previously the Associate Dean (Research and Research Training), Assistant Dean for the PhD Program, and Acting Dean, and is currently Deputy Dean.

DR KEN SETIAWAN

Dr Ken Setiawan
Dr Ken Setiawan

Dr Ken Setiawan is a McKenzie Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Asia Institute. Her research interests include globalisation and human rights, transitional and historical justice, as well as reconciliation and reparation. She has published widely on the politics of human rights in contemporary Indonesia and is the author of Promoting Human Rights: National Human Rights Institutions in Indonesia and Malaysia (Leiden University Press, 2013).

Contact:

For more information about the conference please contact:

Anna Cordner

Email: anna.cordner@unimelb.edu.au


Book Launch. “Unmarked Graves: Death and Survival in the Anti-Communist Violence in East Java, Indonesia” (Vannessa Haerman, 2018)

Wednesday, 31 October 2018

5.30pm-7.00pm

Faculty of Arts Research Lounge, 5th Floor, Arts West Building

The University of Melbourne

RSVP: https://bit.ly/2CTbdOC

 

The anti-communist violence that swept across Indonesia in 1965–66 produced a particularly high death toll in East Java. It also transformed the lives of hundreds of thousands of survivors, who faced decades of persecution, imprisonment and violence. In this book, Vannessa Hearman examines the human cost and community impact of the violence on people from different sides of the political divide.

Her major contribution is an examination of the experiences of people on the political Left. Drawing on interviews, archival records, and government and military reports, she traces the lives of a number of individuals, following their efforts to build a base for resistance in the South Blitar area of East Java, and their subsequent journeys into prisons and detention centres, or into hiding and a shadowy underground existence. She also provides a new understanding of relations between the army and its civilian supporters, many of whom belonged to Indonesia’s largest Islamic organisation, Nahdlatul Ulama.

In recent times, the Indonesian killings have received increased attention, but researchers have struggled to overcome a dearth of available records and the stigma associated with communist party membership. By studying events in a single province and focusing on the experiences of individuals, Hearman has taken a large step toward a better understanding of a fraught period in Indonesia’s recent past.

“This extraordinary book documents with care, not only the horror of living through the 1965 killings, but also the political lives of members of the Indonesian Left. Through oral history Hearman brings to life the struggles of these historical actors and offers a new history of the Indonesian Left.”
– Katharine McGregor, Melbourne University

“Unmarked Graves tells the harrowing story of the Indonesian Communist Party (PKI) in East Java. The party’s prominence in the anticolonial struggle gave it especially deep roots in the region. When the Indonesian Army’s extermination of communism spread across the country after 1965, East Java became the last and most tenacious holdout region. Hearman’s moving account of resistance, survival and loss reveals the deep engagement of the PKI with political life in East Java and the transformation wrought by military suppression.” – Robert Cribb, Australian National University

Vannessa Hearman holds a PhD in History from the University of Melbourne. She lectures in Indonesian Studies at Charles Darwin University in Australia.

Publication Year: 2018
288 pages, 
229 X 152mm

 


#Palu Pulih. Fundraising BBQ

Melbournians, come along to our Central Sulawesi Earthquake and Tsunami Fundraiser BBQ! Sat 27 October, 11am-2pm, South Lawn.

Entry by donation: $30 adults, $5 children (use Trybooking link below). All donations go to local organisations engaged in recovery efforts https://t.co/47FxscXS2h


Monthly Discussion “Anak Muda, Bisa Apa?”

 

The Millennials, Media and Politics

 

Friday, 19 October 2018

5.15-7.30pm

Arts West Building

Room 553 (Discursive Space)

The University of Melbourne, Parkville

 

RSVP: https://bit.ly/2QKT5JH

The youths, or the millennials, have currently become a new subject that all parties and presidential candidates seek to mobilise them as the new basis of constituencies. But, who are the millennials and why has this group increasingly become so central in current Indonesian politics? The discussion of this session addresses these questions from two angles. First, from the lens of demographic changes. Specifically, how such changes have produced a distinct group, called the millennials, with its distinct characters and aspirations. Second, from the lens of media and politics. It is apparent that the media plays a prominent role in constituting the millennials subjects. How have the anxiety, solidarity, and collective aspiration of the youth been facilitated by the media? And, how the media and this group are appropriated by the competing elites for power contestation? Ultimately, how do such dynamic would shape Indonesian politics, especially in its relation to the upcoming 2019 election?

Speakers:

Dr Ariane Utomo (School of Geography, The University of Melbourne)

Hellena Sousia (PhD Cand., Asia Institute, The University of Melbourne)

Dr Nyarwi Ahmad (Postdoc Fellow, The University of Melbourne)

 


Monthly Discussion and Documentary Screening “Hantu Lama Bersemi Kembali”

Wednesday, 19 September 2018

5.15pm—8pm

Arts West Building,

Room 156 (Lectrorial Room 1)

The University of Melbourne

RSVP: https://bit.ly/2CYBewQ

 

Broadly speaking, the topic will be on the politics of human rights by specifically discussing the issues of 1965. How do we assess this issue especially under the Jokowi administration? What are the challenges and opportunities to address the human rights violations especially associated with 1965 issue? What are the problems and achievement of the existing approaches or measures? What is the prospect of the human right issues after the 2019 election?

The discussion will be preceded by a documentary Screening “Sekeping Kenangan” (produced by Taman 65, 2018).

 

Speakers

Professor Saskia Weiringa (University of Amsterdam)

Roro Sawita (Taman 65)

 


37th Indonesia Forum Postgraduate Roundtable

The Indonesia Forum of the University of Melbourne is hosting a roundtable discussion in 2018 for postgraduates who are engaged in research related to Indonesia. This year the Forum celebrates its 27th year of running as a cross-disciplinary informal and open network of academics and broader communities who share a common interest and professional involvement in Indonesia. The event brings postgraduate (both master & PhD) students together in a multi-disciplinary exchange of scholarly interests and information and provides an opportunity for networking. The aim is to introduce your work to a wider audience, receive inputs from senior academics and make connections with other students and academics whose research may overlap with yours. Certificates will be awarded to presenters. Students are asked to make a 10-minute presentation, in a panel assigned based on their research areas, describing their research in English. Certificates will be awarded to presenters. Refreshments and lunch will be provided.

If you wish to give a presentation or attend, please submit this form: https://goo.gl/forms/Z5sfzIki3wYmNXz83

 

 


Special Monthly Discussion. Dialog Dua Dekade: Democratisation and Its Challenges

Saturday, 25 August 2018

10.30am-2.45pm

Yasuko Hiraoka Room

Sidney Myer Asia Centre

The University of Melbourne

 

All welcome, please register here.

 

Description

The discussion addresses the current state of Indonesia’s democratisation, by linking it to the challenges for the 2019 elections. Following the demise of the authoritarian regime, institutional reforms have not brought about a substantial change. Prominent problems such as inequality, corruption, and human rights violations still persist. Particularly since 2017, the politicisation of identity for electoral contests has been a pressing issue. Not only perpetuating exclusionary politics and thus polarising societies, mobilisation of identity-based politics also significantly influences the workings of Indonesian democracy. Recently, scholars have come to argue that Indonesia’s democracy is experiencing a noticeable setback, even from those who are previously optimistic of democratic transition and consolidation. How do we understand the trajectories of Indonesia’s democracy? How do the current socio-political conditions affect the upcoming elections? What are the consequences for the future of democratisation agenda?

 

The first session (10:30 – 12:00)

This session discusses the overview and reflection of 20 Years of Reformasi.

 

Speakers:

Professor Vedi Hadiz (Asia Institute, University of Melbourne)

Professor Ariel Heryanto (Monash University)

Moderator and Discussant:

Dr Dirk Tomsa (La Trobe University)

The second session (12:45 – 14:45)

This session will highlight the challenges of reform in several sectors, including the issues of foreign policy, human rights, law reforms and political Islam and identity politics.

 

Speakers:

Dr Helen Pausacker (CILIS, University of Melbourne)

Dr Dave McRae (Asia Institute, University of Melbourne)

Professor Greg Barton (Deakin University)

Dr Ken Setiawan (Asia Institute, University of Melbourne)

Political Islam and Identity Politics: Prof Greg Barton Moderator:

Dr Amanda Achmadi (University of Melbourne)

 


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